One day, his credit card gets lost, his airline loses it and he doesn’t realize it for two years

In November 2015, while on vacation in Italy with his wife and family, Jonathan Miller left his credit card at the local branch of the American Express travel agency. He was confused and thought…

One day, his credit card gets lost, his airline loses it and he doesn’t realize it for two years

In November 2015, while on vacation in Italy with his wife and family, Jonathan Miller left his credit card at the local branch of the American Express travel agency. He was confused and thought he had to cancel it, but American Express had very strict rules about leaving debit cards behind, and the procedure was that they had to be reported stolen within 48 hours.

It took him almost two years to file an official complaint, but on Wednesday, the credit card company finally sent a letter of apology, confirming that it had refunded his entire balance and apologized for any inconvenience that the delay may have caused.

Sadly, when he returned the credit card to its rightful owner — Harrison Ford — he was told that the credit card company is no longer allowed to act on the complaint, as the incident was classified as “card not present.”

The letter from American Express explained: “Since your call was made over the phone and through our online customer services line, the report was forwarded to a senior call center manager to investigate. Upon further investigation, we learned that the card was lost or stolen overseas and not in the United States. We have apologized for the delay in your response, and have refunded your card at your request, and have also added a reference to your account, which makes your re-issued card safe. This does not include refunding any fees or interest accrued on your card, as your complaint is being treated as card not present.”

“It seems the card was lost overseas because I was talking with the person at the airport in America,” Miller told Refinery29. “American Express didn’t even know that their own rules did not allow them to give me the refund as they asked. They are definitely wrong because that’s not the case.”

Another reader, Kerry Tamari, has since written a letter to the company apologizing for the lack of communication and informing them that she would report the incident as a fraud and seeking a partial refund for all fees that she had paid to the company.

In the meantime, what’s a nice dude like Miller to do — he just took it upon himself to fix American Express’s error so that the company would know that his loan is “safe.”

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