More children now at risk for developing autism because of flu shot

Ever wonder how many of the children who develop autism could be at risk for becoming later-onset cases in adulthood, or perhaps a lifelong condition? The answer is enough to turn even the toughest…

More children now at risk for developing autism because of flu shot

Ever wonder how many of the children who develop autism could be at risk for becoming later-onset cases in adulthood, or perhaps a lifelong condition? The answer is enough to turn even the toughest skeptic’s stomach.

Today’s paper, in fact, has an article that details a startling number of young children now diagnosed with autism whose risk of later developing the disorder, at the earliest stage, is correlated to the rate of the flu vaccine.

For reference, adult onset autism is about 40 percent to 50 percent more likely to develop in young adults, and past studies have linked the flu shot to it. Now a new paper reviewed by the researchers in this new research paper found that children born between 1999 and 2006 are showing a risk similar to the elderly, including about one-third of all cases. Only a handful of children have ever developed autism while infected by H1N1, but the fact that so many more were affected may come as a surprise to many, at least to those of us who prefer to believe that the virus is primarily to blame.

But just to reiterate: Your guess is as good as anyone else’s about whether or not this is what we’re talking about. The review only looks at a small percentage of the population of young children born in the group reviewed, and only when the flu shot was administered with two separate shots, containing the component that triggers the brain’s immune response. But it seems that this group of children has already been in for some heavy-duty viral exposure. What can we do to prevent it?

Do you think flu shots could be important in preventing autism later in life?

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