From Picasso to Goldfinch: A new exhibit of works by acclaimed dancer-critic Stanley Whitney

Stanley Whitney, the dance critic of The New York Times since 1968, is having an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. Stanley Whitney Dances With Matisse, which has been on view at the…

From Picasso to Goldfinch: A new exhibit of works by acclaimed dancer-critic Stanley Whitney

Stanley Whitney, the dance critic of The New York Times since 1968, is having an exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art. Stanley Whitney Dances With Matisse, which has been on view at the Met for almost two years, comes to MoMA on Friday, Aug. 3, 2018.

Since April 2015, as “Soaring Pristine: Elizabeth Leach and the Skarstedt Gallery,” Stanley Whitney has moved briskly through the geometric trappings of the late 18th century and the grand landscapades of the 19th century on the Manhattan architectural landscape.

His eye is sharp, his sense of perspective acute. He keeps it that way through an ordinary, solitary visit to gallery after gallery. Yet as he moves from place to place, he also moves in time and space with the lives of the artists he is gathering and recording in this, his longest survey to date.

Among the notable figures on display in this retrospective, with their colors, subject matter and styles of daily life, are everyone from masters of the 17th and 18th centuries to the sculptor Hals to the dealer Wilfredo Lam, to the sculptor Grant Wood, to the painter Etta Nash and much more.

On view at MoMA through Jan. 6, 2019, Stanley Whitney Dances With Matisse includes more than 300 paintings, drawings, prints, maps, sculptures and drawings from the paintings and drawings and the prints, drawings, sculptures and drawings that show the artist’s metamorphosis from painter to artist-critic.

The museum will also be hosting two related exhibitions, one on view at MoMA on Aug. 4 through Jan. 6 and one opening on Sept. 7 and continuing through Jan. 6, 2019.

The first, Anthony Young’s installation “F.W. Miller: The Masters, Matisse and Picasso,” is a reference to a show of the same name which opened in 2011 at the Sotheby’s gallery in New York. The show allowed Miller, a contemporary art collector and art historian, to examine 17th- and 18th-century painting.

Miller, the museum said, “is a much subtler artist than Matisse or Picasso and, in fact, many of the artists whom Miller has idolized (Picasso and Matisse) posed for or have referred to him in their works.”

The museum’s two related exhibitions feature complementary works “included in only a few public collections.”

In Stan Whitman Eats Me, by Ranjit Boltakian (1912-2007), bewigged fellow artist Jack Ashby reads from his autobiography as Whitney acts as mute narrator. Photographer John Matejczyk (1963-1988) photographs Whitney and other acclaimed New York artisans (including Bert Williams, Jeff Koons, Joseph Cornell and Tony Oursler), as he examines their fabrics and canvases in conversation.

In Spatial Shoeboxes, James Rubin and Duncan McCall Hammer enter empty cardboard boxes for a guided tour of still lifes and abstractions from the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH). American-born Rubin, director of the exhibition “Greater New York: American Art as Architecture, 1859-1900,” began his career as curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum. He continues to organize exhibitions and publishing for the Historical Survey of American Art at the museum. Hammer, executive director of the museum, founded the 28th-annual Chelsea Art Fair.

The New York Times recommends visiting these exhibitions in this space and at times of day that are convenient for you, taking the bus if possible.

View more photos of the show and the details of activities connected to the show and opening at: https://www.moam.org/journal/stemjew/stanton-whitney-dances-matisse/

In conjunction with the exhibition, there will be guest programs from Sidney McBride, the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Center for American Art in Washington, D.C., John Wilton and the John H. Cheever Foundation in Asheville, N.C., Sara Leibowitz of the Manhattan gallery Boca Vista, Penn. and Jim Beal of Cheever, James and Virginia Laming, Joshua Trumbull, Gary Tintera, and William Steig; and reflections from another of our fantastic correspondents, Roge F. Handbuch and Sharon Schmidt (which we’ll add to soon).

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