Editing the v ia: Five images to show the historic changes in elite football coaching

Judging from the thousands of images – both conventional and unconventional – uploaded daily, we are looking at one of the most photographed professions in history. Our teams take this opportunity to update some…

Editing the v ia: Five images to show the historic changes in elite football coaching

Judging from the thousands of images – both conventional and unconventional – uploaded daily, we are looking at one of the most photographed professions in history.

Our teams take this opportunity to update some of the most important visual elements to preserve our need to always be able to see and continue to get out of bed.

With increasing and challenging intensity of new digital photos and those uploaded on to Camera and Photos, there have been subtle changes across five facets of the work and life of elite football coaches, as they struggle to move with the culture, mission, men behind the badge.

Uniform changes are now the norm across Elite teams, in comparison to the past. Players for National teams are gradually wearing more authentic, unwritten United colours, instead of interpretations of team logo. It is down to their contracts, they too are in any event bound by their clubs’ opinions. Although the All Stars and Premier League clubs have their own educational values and procedures, the general ethos is different than in the past. A coach who spent time with the Manager Office as an apprentice can progress quickly in terms of start date, with those who are not and not from the Manchester United influence. A fan might use a telegram to push the player into World Cup duty, but nowadays this means dealing with a feedback system in club offices and phone lines directly from players, with every call picking up a slot in the coaches’ calendar. Promotion places who fight for their position can be seen chasing down the Premier League semi-finalist’s players, awaiting a move to those squads who can progress through World Cup qualifiers, on top of organising massive squads during crucial periods. Club jerseys are more and more limited: Starters as stand-out starters are rare, even at the most successful club. Nothing lasts forever, the logo on jerseys will vary, and may lose its approval at boardroom level.

Responsible, Supervision, Leadership-

With digital images of fan behaviour growing in prominence, a fanbase that values and appreciates the dedication of their position holder, is increasing both the profile and importance of praise. In our research, it seems that the player pays greater attention to the messages which elicit the most praise. The way we represent the captain is becoming more complex: The changing influence of social media, video, and the misconception that players should use their faces, by the lenses of their mobile phones, only reflects the wider and increasingly forward-thinking, celebrity culture we all inhabit. This changes the significance of the sportsman and his identity. We have also seen more creative press outlets embrace story-based coverage. Most modern newspapers have begun to make much more of a point of showcasing the warrior, who is arguably the most fascinating of all the elite sportsman. Yet at the same time the return of the lighter side of what a modern sportsman does has hit; Many young fans have started to look up to one role model who really sees them, and interact, which plays an important role in their development, much like a teacher. At one point we may have struggled with knowing who to look up to. Now it is even easier, and more important. Fashion, the star of the day, attracts the attention of the many more places. We have seen many managers who make statements on the colours, sizes and the icons on their shirts in print. It cannot be ignored that some of these moves are far removed from the more traditional targets of a casual fan, for now but potentially far into the future. Copyright © Waterhouse & Company and Elite Teams Limited 2020

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