After Hillary Clinton’s loss, would Senate Republicans be able to win back North Carolina?

North Carolina voters have had a lot to keep them busy this year. With the successful reelection of Republican Sen. Thom Tillis, who beat Democratic Rep. Deborah Ross by nearly 6 points, the GOP…

After Hillary Clinton’s loss, would Senate Republicans be able to win back North Carolina?

North Carolina voters have had a lot to keep them busy this year. With the successful reelection of Republican Sen. Thom Tillis, who beat Democratic Rep. Deborah Ross by nearly 6 points, the GOP controls the U.S. Senate, with all its seats up for re-election in 2022 and even its own presidential nomination in 2020.

Notoriously liberal Sen. Bernie Sanders, however, has said he won’t be running.

So, with a Democrat who would likely be the only one running statewide in 2022 already at the top of the ticket, Republicans will hope to avoid another close election in the Tar Heel State, in which party activists watched Sen. Richard Burr handily win in 2016 and Sen. Thom Tillis fatten his majority this November.

As even those eager to not tip their hand on potential nominees can see, Tillis is up for re-election, so with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell saying the GOP has “no immediate plans” to change party rules and allow former Gov. Pat McCrory to run for the U.S. Senate, he appears to be eyeing a statewide rematch.

In fact, after Kim Caughey, his former chief of staff, made some questionable remarks about building a new grand, or nay, arguing Republicans had silenced women throughout his tenure as governor, McCrory has yet to decide whether he’ll seek re-election or find another job.

Watch: McCrory would face a tough race for a political comeback

“He is obviously under a lot of pressure to run, but it’s something he will look at,” G. Terry Madonna, professor of politics at Franklin & Marshall College, told The Daily Beast. “He is under a lot of pressure from people close to him to get into the race.”

When asked on Twitter if he would “run again in 2020,” McCrory wrote: “I want to speak with our grass roots supporters to determine the potential viability of that. Time for us to vote.”

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