15th-century literature retells events in a century plagued by chaos and deceit

At a time when many of us are invited to “celebrate diversity”, our freedom of expression is threatened. With the birth of the patriarchy-rooted democracy of a new day, in a form championed by…

15th-century literature retells events in a century plagued by chaos and deceit

At a time when many of us are invited to “celebrate diversity”, our freedom of expression is threatened. With the birth of the patriarchy-rooted democracy of a new day, in a form championed by George Orwell, we are asked to understand the ways in which the art of culture and propaganda fuse to undermine our knowledge of history, our social interactions and our belief in ourselves.

In this instance, however, the folkways of these cultures take on a political inflexion. Most of us will recognise the ingenious ways in which the gaudy signage of the crass city of Coca-Cola directs us to information for our consumption, and the imagery of its ads has been taught on that entire educational programme of orientation we now have in the Western world, which is, actually, one gigantic advertising/promoting advertising campaign, paid for, sponsored and reinforced by our advertising infrastructure and complacent democratic client-nation. One would think that the traits of a gaudy group like the Coke Crew would have originated under a different environment than the principled and ascetic and austere set of people that are, today, the British people, largely people who are aware of all the insidious ways that their freedoms have been stifled and prevented from expanding ever further – at least in some parts of our country.

The shackles are so closely and intricately tied to modern communication that the language of ideas become a required evil of today’s thinking, which again, in a historical analogy, is the consequence of both the creation of a communications apparatus that is so rampant, and so adaptive that it interprets the emotions of the controllers, and pushes them through more intimate and intimate connections to our needs and desires, to our unconscious desires and needs.

Many communications systems, for example text message, with all its subtle and effective broadcasting, is a powerful mechanism for stealth marketing. Communication has created an anthropological, possibly prophetic narrative about each and every human being. We are programmed to be attentive to carefully crafted and orchestrated behaviours, and our senses play a major part in exploiting our own subliminal wishes, perhaps even making it appear that there are events where there are not actual events. All these factors contribute to the power of artificial perception in today’s communication system. It is extremely difficult to separate out our authentic consciousness with our reaction to various ideas presented. So, the culture of marketing has an enormous opportunity to alter and transpose the realities we see in our heads to the cultural persuasions of modern cultural industries.

In some way, advertising is our individual evolution of a conscious awareness of our subconscious desire – some might call it sex-drive. Advertising is an attempt to influence the unconscious, to create an unconscious, it is an attempt to change the future, to change our perception of the identity and character of others, to change our world and the things that we will see and hear. It is, again, a historical analogy. It is a parallel of how different species, like the frogs and quails used to have their reproductive sounds recorded, both being records of “natural births”, as opposed to recorded on a synoptic map of the world.

However, the final theme of this piece is to cover in some depth the power of how distorted and controlled stories and language get created, and what a clue that they can be for our humanity. No matter what your beliefs are, you may have argued against the band led by the Queen of all Media, but the ultimate undoing of your cause could be that in which your deepest truths are taken out of context, as felt as a mistaken perception of “reality”, and augmented as an artificial self-perception.

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